New American Consulate in Jerusalem

For those of you who have been concerned (upset) about the US Consulate in East Jerusalem catering to the Arab population, I have good news from the CHAI (Cleveland  Hometown Association in Israel) January Newsletter:

American citizens can now get all our consular services—visa, passports, social security changes, etc– in West Jerusalem—Arnona to be exact– in a great new facility. You no longer have to pay exhorbitant private parking rates in a rutted lot. Now there is a brand new parking facility under the building with a few steps up to the entrance, a security area, a large open patio area and finally a spacious hall. Yes, there may still be lines, but the day I went there was no waiting. Telephone numbers are on the website 

http://jerusalem.usconsulate.gov

Make an appointment (Central number is 02-630-4000) for Passport or visa applications (which must be filled out prior to arrival—get them on the website).  Appointment hours are 8:00 to 11:00 a.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday except for U.S. and local holidays. See other hours below.

Since Google can’t actually map the address posted on the Consulate’s site, here are DIRECTIONS:

By car:

  1. Take Rehov Hevron heading south from town.
  2. Turn left to Daniel Yonovsky Street (the road to the Sherover Promenade)
  3. Turn right at the first light onto Betar.
  4. Continue on Betar past all the Kibbutz Rachel apartment buildings
  5. Turn left on Moshe Aryeh Kurtz St.
  6. Turn right at the bottom of the hill to David Flusser Street and go up the hill to the building.
  7. At the circle veer right and then turn left into
    the parking garage (with permission) where you should receive directions to the Entrance.

By bus:

Egged bus numbers 7A and 8 travel on Rehov Betar. Check with the bus company for further information.

In Person Street Address: U.S. Consulate General, Consular Section, 14 David Flusser, Jerusalem 93392  (Near the former Diplomat Hotel, now the Caprice Diamond Center) Location via Google Maps
By e-mail  E-mail AddressJerusalemACS@state.gov  (This is for general passport, citizenship, and other issues not related to social security and Federal benefits.)E-mail address for Federal benefits (including social security-related questions): JerusalemFBU@state.gov

This is the preferred manner of reaching the ACS Section.  Response times are generally between four hours and one business day.

By mail Street Address: U.S. Consulate General, Consular Section, 14 David Flusser, Jerusalem 93392Mailing Address: U.S. Consulate General, Attn: American Citizen Services, P.O. Box 290, 91002 Jerusalem
By phone or fax Phone: 02-630-4000Phone From the U.S.: +972 (0)2-630-4000Fax: 02-630-4070
Emergencies

For emergencies outside of normal business hours ONLY (outside of Monday-Friday, 8:00AM to 4:30PM and holidays) you can contact the Consulate General at 02-622-7250. This emergency number cannot assist with questions regarding regular passport renewals, consular reports of birth, or other routine consular matters.  Non-emergency calls received on this line during Consulate working hours will be transferred back to the numbers listed above.  Please call these numbers directly during regular business hours or send an e-mail to JerusalemACS@state.gov.

Hours

8:00 AM to 4:00 PM for phone or email inquiries.

Appointments are required for visits to the Consulate.  Appointments are generally scheduled between 8:00 AM and 11:30 AM

We are closed on Saturdays and Sundays, as well as American and local holidays.

  This information is current as of 21-Jan-2011, please check the web site for updates.
I wasn’t able to locate the destination on a map – and I don’t consider the Arnona neighborhood to be WEST Jersualem, so use this information at your own risk!
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5 thoughts on “New American Consulate in Jerusalem”

  1. found you again!
    going to the consulate to renew the kids’ passports and i was looking for directions.
    thanks for doing what google maps couldn’t!
    hope all is well with the family
    still cant speak hebrew, how about you?
    best,
    Aviva
    (ulpan morasha, fellow chocolate lover)

  2. Thanks to Levy for this update:
    “I think you missed a turn/street. You have it going straight from Beitar to Korch, where i think you need to go onto Lankin first.
    Also, you spell the street as Kurtz, which may be correct, but on Google maps it is Korch, Which was confusing until i figured it out. Obviously in Hebrew that wouldn’t have been an issue. Either way I made it fine last week for our appointment. Thanks again”

    At the time this article was originally published, I also couldn’t find it on Google Maps. It was a guest post from the Cleveland Hometown Association in Israel that I confirmed at the US Consulate in Jerusalem website. So Thanks to Levy for making the directions more useful 🙂

    Most upsetting today to see that when you navigate to http://jerusalem.usconsulate.gov/locations.html, you’ll find NO location for Jerusalem at all! It only lists a “Gaza E-Consulate” location. It’s not until one navigates all the way through to the Department of State appointment website https://evisaforms.state.gov/acs/default.asp?postcode=JRS&appcode=1 that we find a Jerusalem address for American citizens. Am I the only one wondering why there is an American Consulate for Gaza? Just how many American citizens do you suppose live there?

  3. went to consulate yesterday, and want to point out that there is just one change:

    When you’re on Betar, you need to first make a left onto Lankin, and then a few streets down, make a right onto Kurtz. Halfway down the hill on the right are a few signs – Diplomat Hotel, etc., and you will make that right, go uphill and see the new consulate building. Parking is free.
    If you have young kids, bring toys/snacks/books for them ,as renewing a passport took us about 40 minutes.
    Thanks for posting the directions, it was a big help!

  4. The No. 8 bus does not go down Beitar Street.
    And the No. 7A just changed it’s route. It still goes there but no longer from the central bus station so you’ll have to catch it elsewhere.

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